Category Archives: Immigration

Trump move to end DACA sparks concern from Ogden immigrants

Sunday Oct. 8, 2017

Clarissa was born in Mexico, brought to Ogden as a young girl, but says the United States is home. She’s one of many left wondering what comes next after President Trump’s decision to eliminate DACA. By Tim Vandenack

OGDEN — They’re here lawfully, for now anyway.

But some of the formerly undocumented immigrants who have secured permission to remain in the country under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals initiative, approved under President Barack Obama, are still uncomfortable getting too much publicity. I spoke to two young Ogden women with DACA status in the wake of President Trump’s decision to halt the program, Gisela and Clarissa, but they only wanted their first names used, worried about backlash, chiefly to their undocumented parents.

That shows how touchy the immigration issue is. More significantly, though, their comments shed light on the people most impacted by Trump’s decision, young people who regard the United States as home but, because they were brought here illegally by their parents, live in a sort of limbo.

Here’s the story: Ogden immigrants worry after Trump axes DACA, say U.S., not Mexico, is home.

It’s a big topic in Ogden, as in many places, because of the heavy Latino and immigrant population here. Some are directly impacted, like Gisela and Clarissa. Others are impacted because it affects their immigrant friends and relatives.

Here’s another related story, written in the wake of Trump’s DACA decision: Ogden advocates fear DACA decision will push immigrants back into the shadows.

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Salvadorans, Guatemalans seek new lives in the Ogden area (or, not all Latinos are rooted in Mexico)

Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017

Rufino Bocel, who now lives in Centerville, came to the U.S. from Guatemala in 1991, in part to get away from the violence of the Guatemalan Civil War, then still simmering. He’s one of many I spoke to for a package of articles on Central Americans in Utah. By Tim Vandenack

OGDEN — Most of the Latinos in Utah (like the United States as a whole) have roots in Mexico.

But not all of them.

A subset in the Ogden area and Utah as a whole come from Central America, most notably El Salvador and Guatemala. I’ve long wanted to zero in on non-Mexican Latinos and finally put together a package for the Standard-Examiner.

It took several months, gathering information here and there, searching out contacts, visiting people. I attended services at three evangelical churches, which draw a fair number of Central Americans. I also ate at a Salvadoran restaurant here in Ogden, broke bread with a group at a Pentecostal church and dug into U.S. Census Bureau numbers and other data on killings (violence pushes many out of the region).

I knew that gang activity and the civil wars of the 1980s and 1990s have pushed many from Central America, but it was eye-opening hearing the stories over and over of violence. It’s a far cry from the sorts of stories I’ve heard from immigrants from Mexico, pushed largely by economic concerns (though that country has its fair share of violence, too).

Here’s what I pulled together:
SALVADORANS, CENTRAL AMERICANS COME TO UTAH FLEEING GANGS, VIOLENCE: The main story, offering the accounts of the violence many have faced before coming here to the United States, whether legally or illegally. “If I hadn’t come, they would’ve killed me,” Rafael Moreira told me, alluding to the gang threats he faced in El Salvador.

CENTRAL AMERICANS ON FOOD, GANGS AND BEING MISTAKENLY IDENTIFIED AS MEXICAN: This is a series of photos and quick observations from several of the people I interviewed. “Sometimes the customers ask, ‘Can’t you make tacos, burritos?’ We say, ‘No, sorry,’” said Luis Pineda, operator of an Ogden Salvadoran restaurant, La Cabañita Salvadoreña. “They ask us if we’re Mexican. We say, ‘No, we’re Salvadoran. We’re from El Salvador.’”

SALVADORAN WOMAN SEEKING ASYLUM SAYS UTAH OFFERS PROTECTION, PEACE OF MIND: This tells the story of Araceli, who faced extortion from Salvadoran gangs as the operator of a small clothes stand in a market and paid twice before closing her shop and coming to Utah with her family. “If you don’t give it to us, we know where you live,” one of gang members had threatened back in El Salvador.

Some of the people I met, things I saw in reporting a package of stories on Central Americans in the Ogden area and northern Utah for the Standard-Examiner. See the stories at Standard.net, Visuals.Standard.net. Clockwise from upper right: A woman during a service at Shalom Christian Church in Ogden, home to a large Salvadoran contingent; Ana Canenguez, left, and other women making pupusas, a Salvadoran food, in a south Ogden neighborhood; Rufino Bocel, originally from Guatemala, at the Light and Truth Pentecostal Christian Church in Ogden; Iris Mencia, originally from Honduras, now living in Riverdale, photographed in Ogden; and Marcos Candray, originally from El Salvador, at Shalom Christian Church, where he serves as pastor. #elsalvador #guatemala #honduras #utah #ogden #immigration

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Ogden Latinos, immigrants brace themselves under Trump

Sunday Feb. 26, 2017

Employees from Beto's Mexican Food in Ogden pose outside the restaurant on Feb. 16, 2017, Day Without Immigrants. By Tim Vandenack

Employees from Beto’s Mexican Food in Ogden pose outside the restaurant on Feb. 16, 2017, Day Without Immigrants. By Tim Vandenack

I’m now reporting from Ogden, Utah, for the Standard-Examiner, the local paper here. A big change from The Elkhart Truth in Indiana, but it’s exciting to be here and there’s plenty to write about.

I’m writing about the sizable Latino population and immigration — a particularly hot topic with President Trump‘s focus on the issue.

Here’s what I’ve written on the matter:

Another unfolding story, in a decidedly different vein, has been the case of an expensive house built atop a rise in south Ogden that is gradually disintegrating, putting the home at risk.

Here’s what I’ve written:

Just last Friday, I visited a small community north of Ogden, Garland, to see how people there are coping with flooding, brought on by a particularly heavy accumulation of snow and quick melt-off last week when temperatures rose:

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

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Elkhart Latinos respond to Trump and other post-election coverage

Monday Dec. 4, 2016

Participants in the Elkhart County Republican Party caucus on Friday Dec. 2, 2016, in Goshen. GOP committeemen picked a replacement to fill out Elkhart County Prosecutor Curtis Hill's term when he takes over in January as Indiana attorney general. By Tim Vandenack

Participants in the Elkhart County Republican Party caucus on Friday Dec. 2, 2016, in Goshen. GOP committeemen picked a replacement to fill out Elkhart County Prosecutor Curtis Hill’s term when he takes over in January as Indiana attorney general. By Tim Vandenack

Election coverage didn’t end with the counting of votes the night of Nov. 8.

I kept busy in the days afterward as well, analyzing and understanding the results and what they meant.

In Elkhart County, the election of Donald Trump as president alarmed some Latinos and immigrant advocates, and they gathered to mull the implications of his selection:

The election of Elkhart County Prosecutor Curtis Hill as Indiana attorney general was noteworthy in the context of racial politics. He’s the first African-American GOPer, near as I can tell, and one of only a handful of African-Americans ever elected to statewide office in Indiana, but race seems to have factored little in his contest.

“I’d like to believe that we’re at a point in 2016 where there are just people. There are Hoosiers. There are Americans,” Hill said in an interview with me.

Here’s the story:

U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski resoundingly won a third term and the GOPer was pretty ecstatic about the prospects, in combination with Trump’s victory.

“Now I see a path forward,” she said, alluding to hope for repeal of Obamacare, more aggressive action against ISIS extremists in Syria and an end to what she sees as stifling federal overregulation.

Here’s the story:

Me, Tim Vandenack, on far right, at taping of WNIT's Politically Speaking, aired Nov. 13, 2016. We discussed Nov. 8 elections. Screen grab from program.

Me, Tim Vandenack, on far right, at taping of WNIT’s Politically Speaking, aired Nov. 13, 2016. We discussed Nov. 8 elections. Screen grab from program.

Just last Friday, I covered the caucus of Elkhart County Republican Party committeemen to pick someone to fill the unfinished term of Hill, who’s term as prosecutor still has two years. They tabbed Chief Deputy Prosecutor Vicki Becker and also picked replacements for two other officials elected to higher office last November. The story was pretty straightforward (look here), but it offered the chance to flex some tweeting muscles and I reeled off 17 of them, reporting all the action — and Becker’s naming — in real time.

As in other cycles, I appeared on “Politically Speaking,” the political show on local public station WNIT, as a wonk, discussing and analyzing the election results:

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Elkhart man’s fight to fend off deportation enters new phase

Sunday Oct. 30, 2016

Armando Paez, second from left, continues his fight to remain in the United States. Pictured, from left, with daughter Maria, wife Martha and son Juan. By Tim Vandenack

Armando Paez, second from left, continues his fight to remain in the United States. Pictured, from left, with daughter Maria, wife Martha and son Juan. By Tim Vandenack

Armando Paez has fought for years to stay in the United States.

He’s still here, having successfully fought off deportation. So far. His efforts are entering a new phase, though, after U.S. immigration officials last month rejected his latest request to put off a pending order to return to his native Colombia.

I’ve written extensively about Paez and his family, who came here from Colombia in 1999 with visas, but overstayed them. They filed for political asylum, citing fears they’d be persecuted by leftist guerrillas, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. But that request was denied and they’ve been fighting for a way to stay.

Here’s the latest in the efforts:

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Theft of Elkhart man’s identity by undocumented immigrants leads to headaches, bankruptcy, frustration

Wednesday Oct. 5, 2016

In this archive Elkhart Truth photo, an Elkhart police officer holds false identity cards confiscated by the department.

In this archive Elkhart Truth photo, an Elkhart police officer holds false identity cards confiscated by the department.

Stealing IDs takes a toll.

I wrote late last month (look at this blog entry) about an undocumented immigrant arrested for identity theft, Candida Rosete. She was brought here as a child by her parents, and she defended her place here, saying the United States is her country, even if she doesn’t have papers to be here.

It was in the context of a spate of arrests by the Elkhart County Sheriff’s Department of people who used fake IDs to get work and calls for tips about other suspected undocumented immigrants. The sheriff’s department actions generated a lot of criticism from immigrant advocates.

Last week I went for the other side of things and spoke to a man, Joshua Buelna, whose identity had been stolen by an undocumented immigrant. Life has been terrible for him, and he ultimately had to file bankruptcy because of all the debt incurred illegally in his name. Others used his Social Security number to rent homes, get cars, acquire mobile phone contracts and more and he was left to deal with the fallout after they skipped out on the bills.

As with the first story about Candida, the story about Joshua generated a strong response, many sympathetic with his plight:

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Elkhart County’s Latino population focus of series, “Hispanics at Home?”

Wednesday June 29, 2016

 

HispAtHome

Some of the people I spoke to for The Elkhart Truth series, “Hispanics at Home?” By Tim Vandenack

By now, Hispanics have a well-established presence in Elkhart County.

Aiming to take a closer look at the segment, but wanting to do more than state the obvious — that they’re an increasing share of the population — we took another approach. We’d try to get a sense of how connected the Latino newcomers feel in Elkhart, Goshen and the rest of Elkhart County.

The end result — “Hispanics at Home?”, a three-part series that ran in The Elkhart Truth last month. I helped craft the approach, but it was a team effort, largely involving myself, reporter Sharon Hernandez and Managing Editor Mark Maley. A group of Goshen College journalism students also contributed plenty of material.

A few takeaways:

  • Latinos have their own tight-knit community, their neighborhoods, their stores. Latinos have Spanish-language churches, there’s even a soccer league that caters to a largely-Hispanic population. That tends to create a sense of two parallel worlds.
  • Still, many leaders have emerged and are emerging, trying to raise the voice of Latinos, get them more involved in the broader community.
  • Younger Latinos, comfortable in both the Anglo and Hispanic cultures, bilingual, are increasingly feeling at home here, even if they were born in Mexico or elsewhere in Latin America.

I wrote several stories, shot video and did plenty of social media along the way. I crunched a ton of U.S. Census Bureau figures, which helped document the growth of the segment, where Latinos live and the nature of the population (native or foreign-born, their roots in Latin America). Some of my highlights:

Here’s a promo video I put together to tease the package before its launch:

The immigration issue is big in Elkhart County and the rest of the United States. It’s an issue that draws me, having lived in Latin America, origin of many immigrants here, and I’ve written a lot about it over the years.

 

 

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Elkhart Latinos meet with PD chief, air concerns about dealings with police

Sunday Feb. 22, 2015

Elkhart County immigration lawyer Felipe Merino addresses a Feb. 19, 2016, gathering of Latinos and Elkhart Police Chief Ed Windbigler.

Elkhart County immigration lawyer Felipe Merino addresses a Feb. 19, 2016, gathering of Latinos and Elkhart Police Chief Ed Windbigler.

Undocumented immigrants never cease to inspire strong opinion.

A Facebook friend told me Elkhart Police Chief Ed Windbigler would be appearing at a gathering she was helping promote to discuss police issues with the local Latino community. I can’t recall anything of the sort in Elkhart, though the Latino population here is sizable, more than 20 percent of the population.

I prepared English- and Spanish-language advances (here and here), which generated reaction on their own, particularly since the spur, in part, was a bid for police willingness to grant leeway to undocumented immigrant drivers stopped for driving without licenses. The actual story about the meeting generated even more buzz and reaction, judging by comments and Facebook shares, a testament to the strong sentiments the issue generates.

Concern among undocumented immigrants about getting thrown in jail for driving without licenses during routine traffic stops figured big in the meeting. “I drive every day full of fear that they’ll give me a ticket,” or worse, said one woman. She’s a single mother, she said, so getting jailed would be disastrous, leaving her kids without a caretaker.

Here’s a link to the story:

 

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ICE raids, talk cause the jitters in Elkhart County immigrant community

Sunday Jan. 10, 2016

The detentions of 121 undocumented immigrants by federal immigration officials, announced Jan. 4, 2016, caused the jitters among Elkhart County immigrants. Elkhart County immigration attorney Felipe Merino discusses immigration issues at a Nov. 25, 2014, presentation in this archive photo. By Tim Vandenack

The detentions of 121 undocumented immigrants by federal immigration officials, announced Jan. 4, 2016, caused the jitters among Elkhart County immigrants. Elkhart County immigration attorney Felipe Merino discusses immigration issues at a Nov. 25, 2014, presentation in this archive photo. By Tim Vandenack

On Monday Jan. 4, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson announced the detention of 121 undocumented immigrants in an operation over the prior weekend. He said more action, focused on undocumented Central Americans, could be forthcoming.

That, plus earlier talk of such action, spurred nervousness in the Hispanic and immigrant community in Elkhart County. I received word that evening of Jan. 4 of a supposed raid, ongoing, by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials at an apartment complex in south Elkhart and went. Nothing.

Still, talk was rampant on Facebook and elsewhere about supposed ICE action, the fear of ICE action, and I looked into it, getting in touch with a pair of immigration attorneys and an ICE official, among others. Here’s the story that resulted:

“People are frantic right now,” one immigration attorney told me. “I have folks all over that are on the edge right now.”

Turns out a local law enforcement unit that also goes by the acronym ICE (focused on drug dealers, not undocumented immigrants) had conducted an operation at the south Elkhart complex. They arrested a Hispanic man, but on drug charges, not immigration violations.

 

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